Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Derivative Financial Instruments (Notes)

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Derivative Financial Instruments (Notes)
3 Months Ended
May 02, 2020
Derivative [Line Items]  
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosure [Text Block] Derivative Financial Instruments
We use derivative financial instruments for hedging and non-trading purposes to manage our exposure to changes in interest rates. Use of derivative financial instruments in hedging programs subjects us to certain risks, such as market and credit risks. Market risk represents the possibility that the value of the derivative instrument will change. In a hedging relationship, the change in the value of the derivative is offset to a great extent by the change in the value of the underlying hedged item. Credit risk related to derivatives represents the possibility that the counterparty will not fulfill the terms of the contract. The notional, or contractual, amount of our derivative financial instruments is used to measure interest to be paid or received and does not represent our exposure due to credit risk. Credit risk is monitored through established approval procedures, including setting concentration limits by counterparty, reviewing credit ratings and requiring collateral (generally cash) from the counterparty when appropriate.

When we use derivative financial instruments for the purpose of hedging our exposure to interest rates, the contract terms of a hedged instrument closely mirror those of the hedged item, providing a high degree of risk reduction and correlation. Contracts that are effective at meeting the risk reduction and correlation criteria are recorded using hedge accounting. If a derivative
instrument is a hedge, depending on the nature of the hedge, changes in the fair value of the instrument will either be offset against the change in fair value of the hedged assets, liabilities or firm commitments through earnings or be recognized in Accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) (AOCI) until the hedged item is recognized in earnings. The ineffective portion of an instrument’s change in fair value will be immediately recognized in earnings during the period. Instruments that do not meet the criteria for hedge accounting, or contracts for which we have not elected to apply hedge accounting, are valued at fair value with unrealized gains or losses reported in earnings during the period of change.

We are party to interest rate swap agreements dated May 7, 2015, with notional amounts totaling $1,250 million to fix a portion of our variable LIBOR-based interest payments. The interest rate swap agreements have a weighted-average fixed rate of 2.04%, matured on May 7, 2020, and were designated as cash flow hedges at the inception of the contracts. On September 4, 2018, we entered into additional forward interest rate swap agreements with notional amounts totaling $750 million to fix a portion of our variable LIBOR-based interest payments. The forward interest rate swap agreements have a weighted-average fixed rate of 3.135%, have an effective date from May 7, 2020, to May 7, 2025, and were designated as cash flow hedges at the inception of the contracts.

The fair value of our interest rate swaps (see Note 7) are recorded in the unaudited Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets as an asset or a liability based upon its change in fair values from its effective date. For swaps designated as cash flow hedges, the effective portion of the interest rate swaps' changes in fair values is reported in AOCI (see Note 9), and the ineffective portion is reported in net income/(loss). Amounts in AOCI are reclassified into net income/(loss) when the related interest payments affect earnings.

Quarterly, the Company evaluates the effectiveness of each hedging relationship. To continue to qualify for hedge accounting, the hedging instrument must continue to be highly effective and, for cash flow hedges, the forecasted transactions must continue to be probable of occurring. The Company's commencement of the Chapter 11 Cases (see Note 14) was deemed to be more likely than not as of May 2, 2020, the end of the Company’s fiscal quarter. Accordingly, the Company determined that it was probable that the forecasted transactions will not occur and, therefore, the hedges were no longer effective. As a result, during the first quarter of 2020, the Company recorded a charge of $77 million for discontinuance of hedge accounting, which included $58 million reclassified from AOCI.

On May 7, 2020, the Company did not make a scheduled interest payment on the aforementioned swap agreements and the agreements were cancelled.

Information regarding the gross amounts of our derivative instruments in the unaudited Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets is as follows:
Asset Derivatives at Fair Value Liability Derivatives at Fair Value
($ in millions) Balance Sheet Location
May 2,
 2020 (1)
May 4,
2019 (1)
February 1,
2020 (1)
Balance Sheet Location
May 2,
2020 (1)
May 4,
2019 (1)
February 1,
2020 (1)
Interest rate swaps Prepaid expenses and other $ —    $   $ —    Other accounts payable and accrued expenses $ 77    $ —    $ —   
Interest rate swaps Other assets —      —    Other liabilities —    25    58   
Total derivatives $ —    $   $ —    $ 77    $ 25    $ 58   
(1) Derivatives as of May 2, 2020, were not designated as hedging instruments; derivatives as of May 4, 2019, and February 1, 2020, were designated as hedging instruments.