Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Adoption of New Accounting Standards (Notes)

v3.19.2
Adoption of New Accounting Standards (Notes)
6 Months Ended
Aug. 03, 2019
Adoption of New Accounting Standards [Abstract]  
New Accounting Pronouncements and Changes in Accounting Principles [Text Block] Adoption of New Accounting Standards
In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 842, Leases (Topic 842), a replacement of Leases (Topic 840) and updated by various targeted improvements, which requires lessees to recognize most leases on their balance sheets as lease liabilities with corresponding right-of-use assets. The Company adopted the provisions of the new lease standard effective February 3, 2019, using the modified retrospective adoption method and the simplified transition option available in the new lease standard. This allows us to continue to apply the legacy guidance in the old standard (ASC Topic 840, Leases (ASC 840)), including its disclosure requirements, in the comparative periods presented in the year of adoption. The Company also elected the package of practical expedients available under the transition provisions of the new lease standard, which include a) not reassessing ASC 840 evaluations on whether expired or existing contracts contain leases, b) not reassessing lease classification, under ASC 840, and c) not revaluing initial direct costs for existing leases under ASC 840. We also elected the practical expedient to carry forward our historical accounting for any land easements on existing contracts.

In addition, the Company changed the accounting for the failed sale-leaseback of its home office to comply with the new lease standard's guidance for sale-leaseback accounting, and recorded a "day one impairment" of the new right-of-use assets that were included in previously impaired asset groups associated with long-lived assets. Per the transition guidance of the new lease standard, the failed sale-leaseback is considered a valid sale and leaseback that resulted in the removal of the related real
estate assets of $153 million and the financing obligation of $208 million, and the recognition of the $55 million gain on sale in Reinvested earnings/(accumulated deficit). Adoption of the new lease accounting standard also required us to reevaluate the accounting for a $50 million promissory note issued in connection with the sale of the home office. In accordance with previous guidance, the promissory note was not recorded in the Consolidated Balance Sheets and not included in the implied gain on sale, however, under the new guidance, the promissory note is considered variable consideration under ASC 606, Revenue for Contracts with Customers. Accordingly, in transition, the Company did not recognize any amount for the $50 million promissory note, as management assessed the most likely amount of variable consideration to be zero given the associated local real estate market dynamics. In regards to the "day one impairment" charge, the Company evaluated the new right-of-use assets added to certain store asset groups that were previously determined to be impaired. Given the facts and circumstances that were still in existence upon adopting the new lease standard, the Company recorded an approximate $40 million impairment charge to Reinvested earnings/(accumulated deficit) to adjust the net book value of the new right-of-use assets to their fair value.

The following table provides the overall unaudited Interim Consolidated Balance Sheet impact of applying the new lease standard effective as of February 3, 2019. Due to the change in accounting for the Home Office sale-leaseback, there was a change in classification of $5 million and $10 million, respectively, in lease costs from Depreciation and amortization and Net interest expense in the prior year period to Selling, general and administrative expenses in the current year quarter and year-to-date period. There was no significant impact to the Company's unaudited Interim Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows.
 
Balance as of February 3, 2019
($ in millions)
Balances removed under prior accounting
 
Balances added/reclassified under new lease standard
 
Net impact of new lease standard
Prepaid expenses and other
$

 
$
(5
)
 
$
(5
)
Property and equipment
153

 

 
(153
)
Operating lease assets

 
910

 
910

Other assets

 
(7
)
 
(7
)
Total assets
$
153

 
$
898

 
$
745

 
 
 
 
 
 
Other accounts payable and accrued expenses
$
4

 
$

 
$
(4
)
Current operating lease liabilities

 
85

 
85

Current portion of finance leases and note payable
5

 

 
(5
)
Noncurrent operating lease liabilities

 
1,074

 
1,074

Long-term finance leases and note payable
203

 

 
(203
)
Deferred taxes
10

 

 
(10
)
Other liabilities
11

 
(208
)
 
(219
)
Reinvested earnings/(accumulated deficit)
80

 
(53
)
 
27

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
$
153

 
$
898

 
$
745



In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income Statement-Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.  This standard allows companies to reclassify stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) enacted on December 22, 2017 from Accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) to Reinvested earnings/(accumulated deficit). We adopted ASU 2018-02 on February 3, 2019 and reclassified $53 million (net of federal income tax benefit) of income tax effects of the Tax Act from Accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) to Reinvested earnings/(accumulated deficit).
Effect of New Accounting StandardsOn August 28, 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement. This standard is effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and for interim periods within those years. Early adoption is permitted, including during an interim period. This new standard requires changes to the disclosure requirements for fair value measurements for certain Level 3 items, and specifies that some of the changes must be applied prospectively, while others should be applied retrospectively. The Company is evaluating this new standard, but does not expect it to have a significant impact on its financial statement disclosures.