Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Retirement Benefit Plans

v3.8.0.1
Retirement Benefit Plans
12 Months Ended
Feb. 03, 2018
Retirement Benefits [Abstract]  
Retirement Benefit Plans
Retirement Benefit Plans
 
We provide retirement pension benefits, postretirement health and welfare benefits, as well as 401(k) savings, profit-sharing and stock ownership plan benefits to various segments of our workforce. Retirement benefits are an important part of our total compensation and benefits program designed to retain and attract qualified, talented employees. Pension benefits are provided through defined benefit pension plans consisting of a non-contributory qualified pension plan (Primary Pension Plan) and, for certain management employees, non-contributory supplemental retirement plans, including a 1997 voluntary early retirement plan. Retirement and other benefits include:
Defined Benefit Pension Plans
Primary Pension Plan – funded
Supplemental retirement plans – unfunded
 
Other Benefit Plans
Postretirement benefits – medical and dental
Defined contribution plans:
401(k) savings, profit-sharing and stock ownership plan
Deferred compensation plan

 
Defined Benefit Pension Plans

Primary Pension Plan — Funded
The Primary Pension Plan is a funded non-contributory qualified pension plan, initiated in 1966 and closed to new entrants on January 1, 2007. The plan is funded by Company contributions to a trust fund, which are held for the sole benefit of participants and beneficiaries.
 
Supplemental Retirement Plans — Unfunded
We have unfunded supplemental retirement plans, which provide retirement benefits to certain management employees. We pay ongoing benefits from operating cash flow and cash investments. The plans are a Supplemental Retirement Program and a Benefit Restoration Plan. Participation in the Supplemental Retirement Program is limited to employees who were annual incentive-eligible management employees as of December 31, 1995. Benefits for these plans are based on length of service and final average compensation. The Benefit Restoration Plan is intended to make up benefits that could not be paid by the Primary Pension Plan due to governmental limits on the amount of benefits and the level of pay considered in the calculation of benefits. The Supplemental Retirement Program is a non-qualified plan that was designed to allow eligible management employees to retire at age 60 with retirement income comparable to the age 65 benefit provided under the Primary Pension Plan and Benefit Restoration Plan. In addition, the Supplemental Retirement Program offers participants who leave between ages 60 and 62 benefits equal to the estimated social security benefits payable at age 62. The Supplemental Retirement Program also continues Company-paid term life insurance at a declining rate until it is phased out at age 70. Employee-paid term life insurance through age 65 is continued under a separate plan (Supplemental Term Life Insurance Plan for Management Profit-Sharing Employees).

Voluntary Early Retirement Program
In 2017, the Company initiated a Voluntary Early Retirement Program (VERP) for approximately 6,000 eligible associates. Eligibility for the VERP included home office, stores and supply chain personnel who met certain criteria related to age and years of service as of January 31, 2017. The consideration period for eligible associates to accept the VERP ended on March 31, 2017. Based on the approximately 2,800 associates who elected to accept the VERP, we incurred a total charge of
$112 million for enhanced retirement benefits. The enhanced retirement benefits increased the projected benefit obligation (PBO) of the Primary Pension Plan and the Supplemental Pension Plans by $88 million and $24 million, respectively. In addition, we incurred curtailment charges of $6 million related to our Primary Pension Plan and $2 million related to Supplemental Pension Plans as a result of the reduction in the expected years of future service related to these plans. Additionally, we recognized settlement expense of $13 million in 2017 due to higher lump-sum payment activity to retirees primarily as a result of the VERP executed earlier in the year.

Primary Pension Plan Lump-Sum Payment Offer and Annuity Contract Purchase
In August 2015, as a result of a plan amendment, we offered approximately 31,000 retirees and beneficiaries in the Primary Pension Plan who commenced their benefit between January 1, 2000 and August 31, 2012 the option to receive a lump-sum settlement payment. In addition, we offered approximately 8,000 participants in the Primary Pension Plan who separated from service and had a deferred vested benefit as of August 31, 2012 the option to receive a lump-sum settlement payment.
Approximately 12,000 retirees and beneficiaries elected to receive voluntary lump-sum payments to settle the Primary Pension Plan's obligation to them. In addition, approximately 1,900 former employees having deferred vested benefits elected to receive lump-sums. The lump-sum settlement payments totaling $717 million were made by the Company on November 5, 2015 using assets from the Primary Pension Plan.

On December 7, 2015, the Company completed the purchase of a group annuity contract that transferred to The Prudential Insurance Company of America the pension benefit obligation of approximately 18,000 retirees totaling $838 million.

Actuarial loss of $180 million was recognized as settlement expense as a result of the lump-sum offer payment and the purchase of the group annuity contract.

Pension Expense/(Income) for Defined Benefit Pension Plans
The components of net periodic benefit expense/(income) for our Primary Pension Plan and our non-contributory supplemental pension plans are as follows:
($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Primary Pension Plan
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Service cost
 
$
42

 
$
55

 
$
69

Interest cost
 
143

 
153

 
196

Expected return on plan assets
 
(216
)
 
(215
)
 
(357
)
Actuarial loss/(gain)
 

 

 
52

Amortization of prior service cost/(credit)
 
7

 
8

 
8

Settlement expense
 
13

 

 
180

Other
 

 

 
6

Net periodic benefit expense/(income)
 
$
(11
)
 
$
1

 
$
154

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Supplemental Pension Plans
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service cost
 
$

 
$

 
$

Interest cost
 
7

 
7

 
7

Actuarial loss/(gain)
 
25

 
11

 
1

Amortization of prior service cost/(credit)
 

 

 

Net periodic benefit expense/(income)
 
$
32

 
$
18

 
$
8

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Primary and Supplemental Pension Plans Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service cost
 
$
42

 
$
55

 
$
69

Interest cost
 
150

 
160

 
203

Expected return on plan assets
 
(216
)
 
(215
)
 
(357
)
Actuarial loss/(gain)
 
25

 
11

 
53

Amortization of prior service cost/(credit)
 
7

 
8

 
8

Settlement expense
 
13

 

 
180

Other
 

 

 
6

Net periodic benefit expense/(income)
 
$
21

 
$
19

 
$
162


 
The defined benefit plan pension expense shown in the above table is included as a separate line item in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Assumptions 
The weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine expense were as follows:
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
Expected return on plan assets
6.50
%
 
6.75
%
 
6.75
%
 
Discount rate
4.40
%
(1) 
4.73
%
 
3.87
%
 
Salary increase
3.9
%
 
3.9
%
 
3.5
%
 
 
(1)
As of January 31, 2017. The Primary Pension Plan was remeasured as of March 31, 2017 using a discount rate of 4.34% and as of October 31, 2017 using a discount rate of 3.94%.

The expected return on plan assets is based on the plan’s long-term asset allocation policy, historical returns for plan assets and overall capital market returns, taking into account current and expected market conditions.

The discount rate used to measure pension expense each year is the rate as of the beginning of the year (i.e., the prior
measurement date). The discount rate used, determined by the plan actuary, was based on a hypothetical AA yield curve represented by a series of bonds maturing over the next 30 years, designed to match the corresponding pension benefit cash payments to retirees.

The salary progression rate to measure pension expense was based on age ranges and projected forward.
   
Funded Status
As of the end of 2017, the funded status of the Primary Pension Plan was 102%. The Primary Benefit Obligation (PBO) is the present value of benefits earned to date by plan participants, including the effect of assumed future salary increases. Under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), the funded status of the plan exceeded 100% as of December 31, 2017 and 2016, the qualified pension plan’s year end.

The following table provides a reconciliation of benefit obligations, plan assets and the funded status of the Primary Pension Plan and supplemental pension plans:
 
Primary Pension Plan
 
Supplemental Plans
 
($ in millions)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
Change in PBO
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Beginning balance
$
3,473


$
3,327


$
152


$
176

  
Service cost
42

  
55

  

  

  
Interest cost
143

  
153

  
7

  
7

  
Special termination benefits (1)
88

  

  
24

  

  
Settlements
(217
)
 

 

 

 
Curtailments
(27
)
 

 
3

 

 
Actuarial loss/(gain)
126

  
151

  
31

  
10

  
Benefits (paid)
(161
)
 
(213
)
 
(35
)
 
(41
)
 
Balance at measurement date
$
3,467

  
$
3,473

  
$
182

  
$
152

  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Change in fair value of plan assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning balance
$
3,455

  
$
3,287

  
$

  
$

  
Company contributions

  

  
35

  
41

  
Actual return on assets (2)
451

  
381

  

  

  
Settlements
(217
)
 

 

 

 
Benefits (paid)
(161
)
 
(213
)
 
(35
)
 
(41
)
 
Balance at measurement date
$
3,528

  
$
3,455

  
$

  
$

  
Funded status of the plan
$
61

(3) 
$
(18
)
(3) 
$
(182
)
(4) 
$
(152
)
(4) 
 
(1)
See Note 17 for VERP charges classified in Restructuring and management transition.
(2)
Includes plan administrative expenses.
(3)
$61 million in 2017 was included in Prepaid pension and $18 million in 2016 was included in Other liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheets.
(4)
$29 million in 2017 and $26 million in 2016 were included in Other accounts payable and accrued expenses on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, and the remaining amounts were included in Other liabilities.
 
In 2017, the funded status of the Primary Pension Plan increased by $79 million primarily due to the performance of plan assets. The actual one-year return on pension plan assets at the measurement date was 14.1% in 2017, bringing the annualized return since inception of the plan to 9.0%.
The following pre-tax amounts were recognized in Accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) in the Consolidated Balance Sheets as of the end of 2017 and 2016:
 
Primary Pension Plan
 
Supplemental Plans
($ in millions)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Net actuarial loss/(gain)
$
169

 
$
318

 
$
18

 
$
12

Prior service cost/(credit)
37

  
49

 
(3
)
  
(4
)
Total
$
206

(1) 
$
367

 
$
15

 
$
8

 
(1)
In 2018, approximately $7 million for the Primary Pension Plan is expected to be amortized from Accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) and into the Consolidated Statement of Operations.

Assumptions to Determine Obligations
The weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine benefit obligations for each of the years below were as follows:
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Discount rate
 
3.98
%
 
4.40
%
 
4.73
%
Salary progression rate
 
3.8
%
 
3.9
%
 
3.9
%


Accumulated Benefit Obligation (ABO)
The ABO is the present value of benefits earned to date, assuming no future salary growth. The ABO for our Primary Pension Plan was $3.2 billion as of the end of both 2017 and 2016. At the end of 2017, plan assets of $3.5 billion for the Primary Pension Plan were above the ABO. The ABO for our unfunded supplemental pension plans was $167 million and $133 million as of the end of 2017 and 2016, respectively. 
 
Primary Pension Plan Asset Allocation
The target allocation ranges for each asset class as of the end of 2017 and the fair value of each asset class as a percent of the total fair value of pension plan assets were as follows:
 
 
2017 Target
 
Plan Assets
Asset Class
 
Allocation Ranges
 
2017
 
2016
Equity
 
15% - 35%
 
23
%
 
22
%
Fixed income
 
55% - 70%
 
62
%
 
60
%
Real estate, cash and other investments
 
10% - 20%
 
15
%
 
18
%
Total
 
 
 
100
%
 
100
%

 
Asset Allocation Strategy
In 2009, we began implementing a liability-driven investment (LDI) strategy to lower the plan’s volatility risk and minimize the impact of interest rate changes on the plan funded status. The implementation of the LDI strategy is phased in over time by reallocating the plan’s assets more towards fixed income investments (i.e., debt securities) that are more closely matched in terms of duration to the plan liability.
The plan’s asset portfolio is actively managed and primarily invested in fixed income balanced with investments in equity securities and other asset classes to maintain an efficient risk/return diversification profile. The risk of loss in the plan’s equity portfolio is mitigated by investing in a broad range of equity securities across different sectors and countries. Investment types, including high-yield debt securities, illiquid assets such as real estate, the use of derivatives and Company securities are set forth in written guidelines established for each investment manager and monitored by the plan’s management team. The plan’s asset allocation policy is designed to meet the plan’s future pension benefit obligations. Under the policy, asset classes are periodically reviewed and rebalanced as necessary, to ensure that the mix continues to be appropriate relative to established targets and ranges. 
We have an internal Benefit Plans Investment Committee (BPIC), which consists of senior executives who have established a review process of asset allocation and investment strategies and oversee risk management practices associated with the management of the plan’s assets. Key risk management practices include having an established and broad decision-making framework in place, focused on long-term plan objectives. This framework consists of the BPIC and various third parties, including investment managers, an investment consultant, an actuary and a trustee/custodian. The funded status of the plan is monitored on a continuous basis, including quarterly reviews with updated market and liability information. Actual asset allocations are monitored monthly and rebalancing actions are executed at least quarterly, if needed. To manage the risk associated with an actively managed portfolio, the plan’s management team reviews each manager’s portfolio on a quarterly basis and has written manager guidelines in place, which are adjusted as necessary to ensure appropriate diversification levels. Finally, to minimize operational risk, we utilize a master custodian for all plan assets, and each investment manager reconciles its account with the custodian at least quarterly.

Fair Value of Primary Pension Plan Assets
The tables below provide the fair values of the Primary Pension Plan’s assets as of the end of 2017 and 2016, by major class of asset. 
 
 
Investments at Fair Value at February 3, 2018
($ in millions)
 
Level 1 (1)
 
Level 2 (1)
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
 
$
18

 
$

 
$

 
$
18

Common collective trusts
 

 
100

 

 
100

Cash and cash equivalents total
 
18

 
100

 

 
118

Common collective trusts – international
 

 
155

 

 
155

Equity securities – domestic
 
426

 

 

 
426

Equity securities – international
 
160

 

 

 
160

Equity securities total
 
586

 
155

 

 
741

Common collective trusts
 

 
904

 

 
904

Corporate bonds
 

 
982

 
10

 
992

Swaps
 

 
848

 

 
848

Government securities
 

 
187

 

 
187

Mortgage backed securities
 

 
6

 

 
6

Other fixed income
 

 
143

 
4

 
147

Fixed income total
 

 
3,070

 
14

 
3,084

Public REITs
 
38

 

 

 
38

Real estate total
 
38

 

 

 
38

Total investment assets at fair value
 
$
642

 
$
3,325

 
$
14

 
$
3,981

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swaps
 
$

 
$
(837
)
 
$

 
$
(837
)
Other fixed income
 

 
(5
)
 

 
(5
)
Fixed income total
 

 
(842
)
 

 
(842
)
Total liabilities at fair value
 
$

 
$
(842
)
 
$

 
$
(842
)
Accounts payable, net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(47
)
Investments at Net Asset Value (NAV) (2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Private equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
191

Private real estate
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
62

Hedge funds
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
183

Total investments at NAV
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
436

Total net assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
3,528

 
(1)
There were no significant transfers in or out of level 1 or 2 investments.
(2)
Certain investments that are measured at fair value using the net asset value per share (or its equivalent) practical expedient have not been classified in the fair value hierarchy. The fair value amounts presented in this table are intended to permit reconciliation of the fair value hierarchy to the amounts presented in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
 
 
Investments at Fair Value at January 28, 2017
($ in millions)
 
Level 1 (1)
 
Level 2 (1)
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
 
$
2

 
$

 
$

 
$
2

Common collective trusts
 

 
88

 

 
88

Cash and cash equivalents total
 
2

 
88

 

 
90

Common collective trusts – international
 

 
148

 

 
148

Equity securities – domestic
 
421

 

 

 
421

Equity securities – international
 
113

 

 

 
113

Equity securities total
 
534

 
148

 

 
682

Common collective trusts
 

 
864

 

 
864

Corporate bonds
 

 
919

 
7

 
926

Swaps
 

 
934

 

 
934

Government securities
 

 
185

 

 
185

Mortgage backed securities
 

 
4

 

 
4

Other fixed income
 

 
149

 

 
149

Fixed income total
 

 
3,055

 
7

 
3,062

Public REITs
 
37

 

 

 
37

Private real estate
 

 
15

 

 
15

Real estate total
 
37

 
15

 

 
52

Total investment assets at fair value
 
$
573

 
$
3,306

 
$
7

 
$
3,886

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swaps
 
$

 
$
(928
)
 
$

 
$
(928
)
Other fixed income
 

 
(6
)
 

 
(6
)
Fixed income total
 

 
(934
)
 

 
(934
)
Total liabilities at fair value
 
$

 
$
(934
)
 
$

 
$
(934
)
Accounts payable, net
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(76
)
Investments at Net Asset Value (NAV) (2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Private equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
220

Private real estate
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
135

Hedge funds
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
224

Total investments at NAV
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
579

Total net assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
3,455


(1)
There were no significant transfers in or out of level 1 or 2 investments.
(2)
Certain investments that are measured at fair value using the net asset value per share (or its equivalent) practical expedient have not been classified in the fair value hierarchy. The fair value amounts presented in this table are intended to permit reconciliation of the fair value hierarchy to the amounts presented in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
 
Following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for Primary Pension Plan assets measured at fair value.
 
Cash – Cash is valued at cost which approximates fair value, and is classified as level 1 of the fair value hierarchy.
 
Common Collective Trusts Common collective trusts are pools of investments within cash equivalents, equity and fixed income that are benchmarked relative to a comparable index. They are valued on the basis of the relative interest of each participating investor in the fair value of the underlying assets. The investments are are valued at net asset value (NAV) as fair value and are classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.
 
Equity Securities Equity securities are common stocks and preferred stocks valued based on the price of the security as listed on an open active exchange and classified as level 1 of the fair value hierarchy, as well as warrants and preferred stock that are valued at a price, which is based on a broker quote in an over-the-counter market, and are classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.

Private Equity Private equity is composed of interests in private equity funds valued on the basis of the relative interest of each participating investor in the fair value of the underlying assets and/or common stock of privately held companies. There are no observable market values for private equity funds. The valuations for the funds are derived using a combination of different methodologies including (1) the market approach, which consists of analyzing market transactions for comparable assets, (2) the income approach using the discounted cash flow model, or (3) cost method. Private equity funds also provide audited financial statements. Private equity investments are valued at NAV as a practical expedient.

Corporate Bonds – Corporate bonds and Corporate loans are valued at a price which is based on observable market information in primary markets or a broker quote in an over-the-counter market, and are classified as level 2 or level 3 of the fair value hierarchy.
  
Swaps – swap contracts are based on broker quotes in an over-the-counter market and are classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.
 
Government, Municipal Bonds and Mortgaged Backed Securities  – Government and municipal securities are valued at a price based on a broker quote in an over-the-counter market and classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. Mortgage backed securities are valued at a price based on observable market information or a broker quote in an over-the-counter market and classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.
 
Other Fixed Income non-mortgage asset backed securities, collateral held in short-term investments for derivative contract and derivatives composed of futures contracts, option contracts and other fixed income derivatives valued at a price based on observable market information or a broker quote in an over-the-counter market and classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.    
 
Real Estate Real estate is comprised of public and private real estate investments. Real estate investments through registered investment companies that trade on an exchange are classified as level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. Investments through open end private real estate funds, depending on the type of investment, are valued at the reported NAV as fair value or are classified as level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. Private real estate investments through partnership interests that are valued based on different methodologies including discounted cash flow, direct capitalization and market comparable analysis are valued at NAV as a practical expedient.

Hedge Fund Hedge funds exposure is through fund of funds, which are made up of over 30 different hedge fund managers diversified over different hedge strategies. The fair value of the hedge fund is determined by the fund's administrator using valuation provided by the third party administrator for each of the underlying funds. Hedge fund investments are valued at NAV as a practical expedient.
     
 


















The following tables set forth a summary of changes in the fair value of the Primary Pension Plan’s level 3 investment assets:
 
2017
($ in millions)
Corporate Loans
 
Corporate Bonds
Balance, beginning of year
$

 
$
7

Transfers, net

 

Realized gains/(loss)

 
(7
)
Unrealized (losses)/gains

 
6

Purchases and issuances
4

 
6

Sales, maturities and settlements

 
(2
)
Balance, end of year
$
4

 
$
10

 
 
2016
($ in millions)
Corporate Loans
 
Corporate Bonds
Balance, beginning of year
$
3

 
$
5

Realized gains/(loss)

 
3

Unrealized (losses)/gains

 
(4
)
Purchases and issuances

 
15

Sales, maturities and settlements
(3
)
 
(12
)
Balance, end of year
$

 
$
7



Contributions
Our policy with respect to funding the Primary Pension Plan is to fund at least the minimum required by ERISA rules, as amended by the Pension Protection Act of 2006, and not more than the maximum amount deductible for tax purposes. Due to our past funding of the pension plan and overall positive growth in plan assets since plan inception, there will not be any required cash contribution for funding of plan assets in 2018 under ERISA, as amended by the Pension Protection Act of 2006.

Our contributions to the unfunded non-qualified supplemental retirement plans are equal to the amount of benefit payments made to retirees throughout the year and for 2018 are anticipated to be approximately $29 million. Benefits are paid in the form of five equal annual installments to participants and no election as to the form of benefit is provided for in the unfunded plans.  The following sets forth our estimated future benefit payments:
($ in millions)
 
Primary Plan Benefits
 
Supplemental Plan Benefits
2018
 
$
195

 
$
29

2019
 
196

 
28

2020
 
199

 
26

2021
 
202

 
21

2022
 
206

 
8

2023-2027
 
1,080

 
44


     
Other Benefit Plans
 
Postretirement Benefits — Medical and Dental
We provide medical and dental benefits to retirees through a contributory medical and dental plan based on age and years of service. We provide a defined dollar commitment toward retiree medical premiums.
 
Effective June 7, 2005, we amended the medical plan to reduce our subsidy to post-age 65 retirees and spouses by 45% beginning January 1, 2006, and then fully eliminated the subsidy after December 31, 2006. As disclosed previously, the postretirement benefit plan was amended in 2001 to reduce and cap the per capita dollar amount of the benefit costs that would be paid by the plan. Thus, changes in the assumed or actual health care cost trend rates do not materially affect the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation or our annual expense.

The net periodic postretirement benefit income of $17 million in 2016 and $7 million in 2015 is included in SG&A expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. The postretirement medical and dental plan was terminated effective December 31, 2016. At the end of 2015, the postretirement medical and dental plan had no assets and an accumulated postretirement benefit obligation (APBO) of $8 million.
 
Defined Contribution Plans 
The Savings, Profit-Sharing and Stock Ownership Plan (Savings Plan) is a qualified defined contribution plan, a 401(k) plan, available to all eligible employees. Effective January 1, 2007, all employees who are age 21 or older are immediately eligible to participate in and contribute a percentage of their pay to the Savings Plan. Eligible employees, who have completed one year and at least 1,000 hours of service within an eligibility period, are offered a fixed matching contribution each pay period equal to 50% of up to 6% of pay contributed by the employee. Matching contributions are credited to employees’ accounts in accordance with their investment elections and fully vest after three years. We may make additional discretionary matching contributions. 

The Savings Plan includes a non-contributory retirement account. Participants who are hired or rehired on or after January 1, 2007 and who have completed at least 1,000 hours of service within an eligibility period receive a Company contribution in an amount equal to 2% of the participants’ annual pay. This Company contribution is in lieu of the primary pension benefit that was closed to employees hired or rehired on or after that date. Participating employees are fully vested after three years.

Effective January 1, 2017, the Company added a Safe Harbor 401(k) Plan that was made available for active employees hired on or after January 1, 2007. The Company matching contributions under the Safe Harbor Plan are equal to 100% of up to 5% of pay contributed by the employee. Matching contributions are credited to employees' accounts in accordance with their investment elections and fully vest immediately. The Safe Harbor Plan replaces the non-contributory retirement account.
 
In addition to the Savings Plan, we sponsor the Mirror Savings Plan, which is a non-qualified contributory unfunded defined contribution plan offered to certain management employees. This plan supplements retirement savings under the Savings Plan for eligible management employees who choose to participate in it. The plan’s investment options generally mirror the traditional Savings Plan investment options. Similar to the supplemental retirement plans, the Mirror Savings Plan benefits are paid from our operating cash flow and cash investments.
 
The expense for these plans, which was predominantly included in SG&A expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations, was $46 million in 2017, $49 million in 2016 and $56 million in 2015.